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Upcoming webinar: Sexual transmission of hepatitis C - Research update & implications for gay men's health providers

Presented by the Community-Based Research Centre for Gay Men's Health and CATIE

Date: Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Time: 10:00-11:00 AM PDT

Register here!

Our understanding of Hepatitis C transmission and the development of effective Hep C treatment has evolved dramatically in recent years. In high resource countries, Hep C is primarily passed through sharing used injection drug equipment, however, Hep C infections were occurring among HIV-positive gbMSM who reported not having used injection drugs. This confused public health for years until recent research was able to show that Hep C can be passed through sexual contact.

Campaigns like Frank Talk by the Community Based Research Centre have attempted to educate gbMSM on how Hep C could be passed during rough sexual contact through small traces of blood. Research now shows that Hep C can be found in semen, providing new evidence that Hep C may be transmitted sexually without exposure to blood.

This webinar will highlight the latest research on Hep C transmission and treatment, with the goal of better equipping public health, healthcare providers and gbMSM with updated information about the sexual transmission of Hep C. The webinar will include an overview presentation by Scott Anderson (Hep C writer/researcher at CATIE), as well as presentations from the Pacific Hep C Network (PHCN) and community members with lived experience.

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