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2019

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2018

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2017

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2016

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2015

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2014

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2013

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2012

December (3)
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October (4)
September (2)
August (5)

BC trends in HIV for 2016

Cases

In 2016, the rate of new HIV diagnoses in British Columbia (BC) was 5.1 (241 cases) per 100,000 population which is identical to the rate in 2015 (240 cases).  The highest rates of new HIV diagnoses were in Vancouver Coastal and Northern Health Authorities.

New HIV diagnoses in BC by health authority, 2007 to 2016

Graph of new HIV diagnoses in BC by health authority, 2007 to 2016

Demographics

  • Rates of new HIV diagnoses among both males and females show a general decreasing trend over the past ten years. Males continued to have higher rates of new HIV diagnoses than females.
  • The highest rates among males were in those 25-39 years old and among females in those 25-29 years old.
  • In 2016, 46% of cases were Caucasian, 10% were Asian, and 9% were Indigenous peoples.
  • The majority of new HIV diagnoses among Indigenous peoples are in those who identify as First Nations. The number and rate of new HIV diagnoses among First Nations people have decreased over time and rates in males are comparable to rates in females.

New HIV diagnoses in BC by gender, 2007 to 2016

Graph of new HIV diagnoses in BC by gender, 2007 to 2016

Exposure Category

  • Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) continued to comprise the greatest number of new HIV diagnoses in BC (60% of all new HIV diagnoses in 2016). Trends were elevated but stable with the greatest increase in new HIV diagnoses among MSM born after 1980. Over time, the proportion of new HIV diagnoses among Caucasian MSM is gradually decreasing.
  • The number of new HIV diagnoses among people who inject drugs (PWID) continued to decrease (7% of all new HIV diagnoses in 2016) for both males and females. The decrease in new HIV diagnoses among PWID since 2008 is the main driver of the overall provincial decrease in new HIV diagnoses.
  • There was a decrease in new HIV diagnoses among people who acquire HIV through heterosexual contact (24% of all new HIV diagnoses in 2016).  Within this category, 55% had an identified risk factor for HIV (e.g., partner known to be living with HIV or at higher risk).
  • In 2016, three females were newly diagnosed with HIV through prenatal screening. No infants acquired HIV from prenatal exposure.
  • A total of 44 immigrants living with HIV arrived in BC in 2016; 27% were from countries where HIV is considered to be endemic.

New HIV diagnoses in BC by exposure category, 2007 to 2016

Graph of new HIV diagnoses in BC by exposure category, 2007 to 2016

AIDS

In 2016, the rate of AIDS case reports in BC continued to decrease to 1.4 (65 cases) per 100,000 population.

AIDS case reports in BC and Canada, 1983 to 2016

Graph of AIDS case reports in BC and Canada, 1983 to 2016

The rate of AIDS cases among males has generally been higher than the rate among females; however in 2016, the rate in First Nations women was higher than the rate in First Nations men.
The majority of AIDS case reports among Indigenous peoples are in those who identify as First Nations. The rate of AIDS case reports among First Nations people has decreased since 2007.

For more information

For a detailed description of HIV and AIDS trends in 2016, please visit the BCCDC website to view the 2016 HIV Annual Report.

Categories: Trend watch

Search related content: HIV, AIDS, trends, annual report, BC

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